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Is it possible to shift the thinking of younger music students? Is it possible to make their lessons seem less like a chore and more like a privilege? I think the answer to these questions is yes, and while it is not always the easiest task to accomplish, I think these 4 tips below will help shift your child's thinking and make practice sessions at home a little more peaceful.

One question I hear parents ask most often is, "How old does my child need to be to start lessons?" Many times they are looking for a magic number. "Oh, well you should wait until Suzy is 5 years old before she starts lessons." But every child is different. Every child grows, learns, and matures differently; so a magic number just won't work. So how do you know when it's the right time for you child to start music lessons? Here are 5 Questions to Ask Before Beginning Lessons.

There has been more sightings of yellow school buses, the back-to-school sales abound, Tax Free weekend is upon us, and your child's schedule is very quickly filling up with school, sports, clubs and other activities. Here are 5 reasons why Music Star Studios thinks you should consider adding music lessons into that schedule.

Stage fright is a very real feeling that children and adults alike find themselves dealing with, especially during recital season. Sometimes, those nervous, anxious feelings can help add life and excitement to a performance. But when those feelings get a little overwhelming, stage fright can be a paralyzing feeling that can ruin your child's recital experience. The key to a successful performance is to learn how to recognize and harness those anxious feelings. Below are three strategies for working with your child's stage fright.

As a musician, one thing that is garunteed to rear its ugly head is stage fright. The racing heartbeat, sweaty palms, and nervous anxiety are enough to make any performer sick to their stomach. However, stage fright, while annoying, may be the key to an exciting, engaging performance

Why do we have recitals? You can thank one man: Franz Liszt. Before Liszt, it was believed that a piece written for solo piano would not be able to hold an audience's attention. In 1839, Liszt set out on a European tour to change that idea.

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