UncategorizedHelp, My Child Can’t Remember Their Recital Piece!

April 5, 2017by emilylowe0

Spring has sprung and the time for music recitals is upon us! Music Star Studios is gearing up for their spring recital Sunday, April 30! We are so excited to hear all of the pieces our students are working on, but know memorizing them can be difficult. Here are a few tips for climbing over...

Spring has sprung and the time for music recitals is upon us! Music Star Studios is gearing up for their spring recital Sunday, April 30! We are so excited to hear all of the pieces our students are working on, but know memorizing them can be difficult. Here are a few tips for climbing over those memory hurdles!

1. Make a Mental Roadmap– Analyze your music. Write down the form of the piece (ABA coda), maybe even write down the chord progression of the piece. Look for patterns and repeated motives. If you can map the piece out in your head, it will make performing the piece that much easier.

2. Practice SLOWLY. This is not a student favorite. However, practicing slowly is harder, and makes your mind and memory work more. Practicing your piece quickly usually means that the memory established is muscle memory; which is more likely to fail you in a stressful situation. It’s better to slow your practice down, so you are actively memorizing the song not just in your fingers, but in your mind as well. Added bonus: the tempo of your piece won’t run away like a freight train!

3. Work From the End to the Beginning. Normally, when we learn a piece, we learn the beginning of the song first and then work our way to the end. Naturally, this is usually how we memorize pieces as well. However, this means we are normally very comfortable starting the song and playing the beginning, but we lose steam as we move further along. So why not try reversing it? Start with the last line of the piece and memorize that, then move back a line and work to memorize. This way you are always playing into a section you have memorized, and reinforcing your overall knowledge of the piece; because you are starting in different places.

4. Practice Away From the Piano. Yes, it can be done. Sometimes the best practice takes place away from your instrument. Looking over your music away from your instrument can be a good time to practice fingerings, as well as visualizing your mental map for your piece.

Hopefully, these tips will help your child become more confident and secure with their pieces and lead to a successful recital performance!

If you are in need of music lessons, make sure to check out Music Star Studios!

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