Is it possible to shift the thinking of younger music students? Is it possible to make their lessons seem less like a chore and more like a privilege? I think the answer to these questions is yes, and while it is not always the easiest task to accomplish, I think these 4 tips below will help shift your child's thinking and make practice sessions at home a little more peaceful.

4 Ways to Keep Music Lessons From Becoming a Chore

Is it possible to shift the thinking of younger music students? Is it possible to make their lessons seem less like a chore and more like a privilege? I think the answer to these questions is yes, and while it is not always the easiest task to accomplish, I think these 4 tips below will help shift your child’s thinking and make practice sessions at home a little more peaceful.

1. Listen. Encourage your child to listen to music regularly. Listen to a variety of music,  let them discover their own likes and dislikes. Regularly listening to lots of music allows your child to experience the emotions music can produce and understand how vital music is to the human experience. I also encourage you to take your child to local live music events. Watch this blog and our Facebook page to see posts about upcoming Nashville events.

2. Set Goals. Have your child set a goal to reach. For me, when I was growing up, all I wanted to do was play an arrangement of Grieg’s Norwegian Concerto that I use to watch my mother play. This goal fueled my practice sessions and when I could finally play that song, it was one of my proudest moments. So encourage your child to pick a specific song, or specific task to accomplish. This will let their lessons be more self-directed and help develop their interests and practice habits.

3. Take Ownership.  Encourage your child to take ownership of their lessons. Talk to their teachers and see if they can choose some songs to work on or the order they accomplish tasks in the lesson. At home, let them set their practice routine and/or schedule. These seemingly small switches will really give your child an ownership of their musical experience, and teach them that making music is a privilege.

4. Change the Lingo. When talking about lessons with you child, try to avoid words that usually are tied to their schoolwork. They don’t have musical assignments, they have musical opportunities. Try making their practice sessions goal oriented rather than tied to time limits. This small shift in how things are worded and approached will make their lessons and practicing less like a chore.

Hopefully, these few ideas will give you some ammunition to start shifting your child’s mentality about lessons away from chore-like and more towards appreciation and enjoyment. If you need more ammo, see this article for more ideas. Which idea is your favorite?

If you’re in the need for a music teacher for your student, check out Music Star Studios today to get them started!

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