Stage fright is a very real feeling that children and adults alike find themselves dealing with, especially during recital season. Sometimes, those nervous, anxious feelings can help add life and excitement to a performance. But when those feelings get a little overwhelming, stage fright can be a paralyzing feeling that can ruin your child's recital experience. The key to a successful performance is to learn how to recognize and harness those anxious feelings. Below are three strategies for working with your child's stage fright.

Conquering Your Child’s Stage Fright

Stage fright is a very real feeling that children and adults alike find themselves dealing with, especially during recital season. Sometimes, those nervous, anxious feelings can help add life and excitement to a performance. But when those feelings get a little overwhelming, stage fright can be a paralyzing feeling that can ruin your child’s recital experience. If it were an adult, there would be more options to relieve anxiety (check these guys out as the offer something unconventional). The key to a successful performance is to learn how to recognize and harness those anxious feelings. Below are three strategies for working with your child’s stage fright.

1. Practice, But Don’t Push. Prepare your child for those anxious feelings. Make them feel as comfortable as possible with the coming performance. Have them walk through, as closely as possible, what the experience will be the day of the recital. Have them play in front of some sort of audience; siblings, parents, family, even stuffed animals! The more familiar your child can become with the routine of performing, the more comfortable they will be on the day of the performance.

2. Be Supportive, Not Dismissive. Your child’s feelings of anxiety are very real. When they expess these feelings to you, don’t just dismiss them by saying, “you’ll be fine”. Try to let your child know that you acknowledge the reality of their feelings and assure them that they aren’t alone. Remind them of their preparation for the performance and all of their hard work. “I’m sure the other kids feel just as worried as you do, but remember how much work you’ve done with your songs!”

3. Be Their Cheerleader. Don’t get caught up in telling your child what they did wrong, or what they could have done better. Your child’s teacher will handle that. Applaud everything they have worked for and applaud their performance, even if it is a practice performance at home!

Hopefully these strategies will help assuage any feelings of stage fright your child may experience. Music Star Studios is gearing up for its annual spring recital, want to join the fun? Contact us!

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