Instrumentsmusic lessonsUncategorizedViolin Lessons3 Things to Look for When Purchasing a Violin and What to Expect Cost-Wise

February 9, 2012by emilylowe

3 Things to Look for When Purchasing a Violin and What to Expect Cost-Wise 3 Things to Look for and What to Expect Cost-Wise When Purchasing a Violin When you're looking to buy a violin for yourself or your child, it can seem a little overwhelming. The cost of a violin can range from a hundred dollars to thousands or millions of dollars depending on the quality. But what should you expect to spend and what makes a particular violin a quality instrument?

3 Things to Look for When Purchasing a Violin and What to Expect Cost-Wise

3 Things to Look for and What to Expect Cost-Wise When Purchasing a Violin
3 Things to Look for and What to Expect Cost-Wise When Purchasing a Violin

 

When you’re looking to buy a violin for yourself or your child, it can seem a little overwhelming. The cost of a violin can range from a hundred dollars to thousands or millions of dollars depending on the quality. But what should you expect to spend and what makes a particular violin a quality instrument?

If you genuinely want to see success for yourself or for your child as a violinist, you will probably need plan to invest some money in a good instrument. Nice-sounding violins can sometimes be pricey, but the sound they are able to produce is well worth the cost! When you buy a high-quailty violin, it is a good investment. Most violins actually improve with age, so if you take care of it and play it regularly, its value will increase!

The good news is that you don’t have to spend thousands of dollars to get a nice violin.

For a beginner, a violin should cost around the $500 range.

When the student has graduated to the intermediate level, the violin should be upgraded – this second violin will most likely be in the $1000 range.

Once a student is playing advanced repertoire, an investment should be made in a higher quality violin.  This third violin will most likely cost anywhere from $4,000-$5,000.

For professional violinists, the sky is the limit when considering cost.

If you are looking for a violin yourself, here are a 3 things that you should check out before purchasing:

  • The violin should be in good physical shape…no cracks or seams pulling apart
  • Everything on the violin is functioning correctly….especially make certain that the tuning pegs turn smoothly and maintain the string’s pitch.
  • The sound of the instrument is the single most important factor in buying a violin, even for a student-level instrument. For a violin in the $500 range, you may want to take along someone more knowledgeable about violins to help make this determination.

If you don’t feel comfortable trying to select a violin on your own, seek the help of a professional. Your teacher can be a great source of help. Not only does he or she know what a quality violin should look and sound like, but your teacher also probably knows where you can buy a good instrument locally. If you don’t currently have a violin teacher, find a reputable music store that specializes in string instruments. If you are a parent of a young beginner, you need to know that children must be “fitted” to find the correct size of violin.  You may want to consider renting this first instrument since your child will probably need one of these smaller sizes, such as 1/16,  1/2 or 1/4 size violin.

If you prefer purchasing to renting this first violin, then know that there are stores which will allow you to trade the instrument in for a larger one as the student grows.

If you think you have found a ‘diamond in the rough’ in someone’s attic or at a garage sale, have it evaluated by your teacher or other professional before making your child learn to play it. This can save you and your child lots of frustration since it may be a poor quality instrument.

It  can be tempting to see a pretty, shiny violin in a catalog, on ebay, or at a yard sale and assume that because it looks good it must be a good instrument. However, the quality of a violin is rarely based on its looks. Instead, a violin needs be chosen based on how it plays and sounds. There are thousands of cheaply made instruments being sold, some for less than a hundred dollars, that are making it difficult for students to learn to play successfully. Many of these instruments possess pegs that won’t stay in place, bridges that are mis-formed or mis-placed, or they simply produce an unpleasant sound no matter how well you play them. For a student, it can be very discouraging to practice long hours and not be able to hear a nice sound coming their violin due to the quality of the instrument itself. This sort of situation sets a student up for failure. By choosing the right instrument from the beginning, the student then has the opportunity to achieve their full potential!

Recommended sources in Nashville, TN for purchasing a violin:

 

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